1. The first time

🐻 A ’s perspective
The first impression is always an important one. When a kid discovers something new — no matter what that is — they will observe, analyse, then try it out. They can be a little lost at times, not knowing what comes next. They might also not understand the nature of what they’re experiencing. But you will be able to tell if it’s a positive thing for them pretty quick. For most kids, it’s best if a task isn’t too complex or hard to decipher. If it is or if they don’t like it, they’ll stop what they’re doing and start playing with something else.

📱 A design’s perspective
The sensation people have when they use your product for the first time is quite like what kids can feel. It needs to be easy enough for them to start using with as little explanation as possible. If a product is hard to navigate, too cluttered and doesn’t bring any value to your users, they will close it. The next thing they’ll do is long-press the app icon, waving it goodbye in a heartbeat.

📝 Takeaway point
In both instances, setting the scene so that it’s easy, fun and/or rewarding to get started with anything is critical. It usually comes down to simplifying things to the basic needs people/kids might have. The first time is key, make sure it’s a good experience.

2. A matter of intuition

🐻 A parenting’s perspective
It doesn’t take long to see how kids go about pretty much anything. They trust their instincts and try things out. They don’t succeed at times but their resilience is incredible. They fall down and get back up instantly. When it comes to using objects/toys or navigating situations, they rely heavily on their intuition. They do something – anything – expecting some kind of result. When it’s easy to use, they’ll thrive. When it’s complex, they’ll seek answers. If they don’t find a solution after some time, they’ll express their frustrations (read: throw a tantrum).

📱 A design’s perspective
A user (first timer or not) will act in a very similar fashion when using your app, product or service. Not everyone will use what you built the same way but it’s fair to say they will expect an intuitive experience no matter who they are. They will bring personal bias and experience along with them but are more likely to keep using your service if it feels familiar in how it can be used. After all, if actions are hard for the brain to process or understand, chances are they will not love using it.

Press this > Find this > Click this > This happens as a result

📝 Takeaway point
No matter the situation, make sure to approach it keeping patterns in mind – whether behavioural, visual or lingual. Use what kids/people are familiar with so they can feel right at home from the get-go. Then build on top of it.

3. Speak the right language

It’s about how you speak to someone but also your ability to listen to them. This is something you need to get used to when you have a little one at home or are that require ongoing iteration.

🐻 A parenting’s perspective
Looking back at my first few years of being a parent, I can say for certain that language is of the utmost importance. The words you use are critical when it comes to helping your child grow and learn. They are signals for what they can or can’t do, for what’s good or bad, etc. Kids associate words with objects, people or situations. Those words become vocabulary and eventually shape who they shall become.

📱 A design’s perspective
Now let’s have a look at the message for your product. Words are important at every step of your funnel. From when your potential users are still considering using your service through to when they’re actively using it. At first, it needs to sell. Yes I know, some people don’t like that word. But really, if you’re not explaining your product well enough or doing it in a way that doesn’t resonate with others, your efforts will be inconclusive. Then, there is the on-boarding part. With very few words, you need to summarise how users can get started in a matter of seconds. Once they’re in, words (alongside images) will be critical in guiding users to successfully complete the task they’re using your service for. If the language is unclear or too complex to understand, there’s a high probability they will fail to complete the task.

📝 Takeway point
Language is one of the most powerful tools in your arsenal—use it wisely. From experience, I find that it’s always best to use simple words to explain what you want someone to understand. Simple and effective does wonders.

4. Know who you talk to

🐻 A parenting’s perspective
I know for a fact that kids can be demanding. That’s because pretty much anything they encounter is new. It will take them some time to understand things fully before they can decide on where their preferences are at. Taking time to analyse what they think, how they react to specific situations or why they seem to display discomfort is extremely valuable. It greatly improves your chances to provide a timley solution—one that is adapted to their problem/need.

📱 A design’s perspective
The same goes for what you’re building (or are planning to). Understanding your audience and their needs is one of the keys to a successful product. Your product might as well not exist if there isn’t an audience using it. If your product already exists, gathering user feedback every step of the way can take your product from good to . It’s what your users need that should shape how forthcoming work needs to take place.

📝 Takeway point

It’s by getting to know your child or your user’s habits that you can gain access to unfathomable knowledge. Learn to listen more than you speak and your ability to shape their experience will grow exponentially.



Source link https://blog..io/designing-great-products-is-like-parenting-e78f57495bb5?source=rss—-eb297ea1161a—4

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here